Ed Vidlak, AIA, NCARB

Architect
Key Projects:
  • Eiseley and Walt Libraries, Lincoln City Libraries (with another firm)
  • UNK Exercise Science Education & Research Center (with another firm)
  • UNL Johnny Carson Center for Emerging Media Arts (with another firm)
  • Omaha NorthStar Foundation Expansion (with another firm)
  • Wyoming State Capitol Renovations & Restoration (with another firm)

Ed Vidlak, AIA, NCARB

Architect

Ed joined the BVH team in November of 2020. Born in Omaha, raised in Iowa and attending Tri-Center, Neola High School, he boomeranged back to Nebraska for both his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Architecture at UNL. 

His first 10 years in the profession were with two Nebraska-based design firms, proudly serving Nebraska and Iowa communities and clients across the region. His portfolio includes planning, design, and project delivery of education facilities for both K12 and higher-ed, community and academic libraries and cultural centers, religious facilities, corporate commercial, health, government, and financial institutions. 

He spent the last twenty-years at two international design firms—serving firm and project leadership roles across North America, Middle East/North Africa, and Asia.  

Joining BVH is a welcomed homecoming for Ed, returning to his roots in Omaha, Lincoln, and Denver. He is eager to support the firm’s clients and strategic initiatives, including leading the firm’s initiative to expand its already highly diverse and award-winning higher-education portfolio. 

Ed has served local, state and national leadership roles with the American Institute of Architects. He is a graduate of Leadership Omaha.

What is your favorite place you’ve visited?
3-way tie: Yellowstone National Park; the Nebraska Sandhills; Florence, Italy.

What is your area of interest or research?
Elevating higher education and science to meet global challenges.

What is the most impactful thing you’ve learned over the course of your career?
The whole is always greater than the mere sum of its parts. A collaborative effort, a design solution, the integration of that solution into its community, the ability for that solution to inspire its user, the solution’s impact on its environment. Respecting a sense of ‘gestalt’ in everything we do is probably the most important lesson I’ve learned along the way. 

What problem would you like to solve with design?
Expanding access to opportunities and ideas. I truly believe that design and planning professionals in our industry have the capacity to drive meaningful, positive change to address society’s global challenges, including public health, civil and human rights, the growing economic divide, and climate change.