Knowledge People Wonder

What’s in a Name?

Mark Bacon

If you have been tracking our recent blog posts you undoubtedly have noticed a flurry of activity. We have been working feverishly to freshen our brand, roll out a new logo and celebrate with our newly-promoted people. We even freshened our attire and desks with some new swag.

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There is one change, however, that can’t go unnoticed. It is the smallest change with the largest meaning. The shift is subtle; the result is reverberating.

BVH Architects is now BVH Architecture.

 

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The architecture industry is changing. Rarely are architecture firms comprised solely of architects. Rarely today are design teams formed with the traditional design alliances of architects, engineers and contractors. We may align ourselves with interior designers, exhibit designers, material scientists or anthropologists. To ensure projects transcend the ordinary and expected, we may need to hire landscape architects, educational specifiers, capital campaign managers or ecologists. The bottom line is that BVH is no longer just about architects. Today, we are a diverse collective of people with a multiplicity of specialties with a singular focus to practice architecture.

We believe this speaks volumes about our workplace, too. If you’re a talented individual impassioned by design, we want you to work with us. We don’t care what your formal training entails, just be part of the team. In addition to architects on staff we employ interior designers, a planner, construction specialists, a communication strategist, and a graphic designer.

Likewise, the shift to “Architecture” removes the concentration from us to the end result—a building or place—that impacts people or communities. We love what we do and we love to celebrate our work. But we also desire to make a profound impact in our communities through what we leave behind: Architecture. Architecture is the built environment shaping our cities, our neighborhoods and our experiences. We are not designing the buildings for ourselves, but for the people who engage with them and who live in the communities they occupy.

So while it may seem like only a few letters, to us, it’s an important transition that defines who we are as a firm, what we do and who we serve.