Ryan Walker

Architectural Intern

Ryan Walker

Architectural Intern

Born and raised in Olathe, Kansas, Ryan joined BVH as an architectural Intern in January 2019 while a graduate student at Kansas State University.  At K-State, Ryan has participated in the local AIAS chapter and continues to assist/support fellow students in the Student Advisory board, NOMAS, and WID organizations.

Inspired by art and music at a young age, Ryan’s interest in design stems from a love for creativity and the ability to share ideas and emotion through a physical medium. 

Architecture became his main interest as a participant in his high school’s Environmental Design accelerated studies program. This became his first focused introduction to architecture, architectural engineering, planning, and design. 

Ryan is now especially focused on educational architecture, driven by the potential to better accommodate students and meet their needs through careful research and design. Ryan hopes to continue exploring the field and push our understanding of the relationship between design, education, and architectural experience farther. This has become his focus and topic of research in his graduate work.

Outside of work, Ryan is an avid reader, painter, and music listener, and loves spending his time at concerts, museums,  and bookstores. He also loves spending time outdoors, hiking, running, playing tennis, playing golf, and attending wildcat football games.

What is your favorite place you’ve visited?
Los Angeles, CA.

What are you reading/watching/doing/listening to right now that is inspiring your work?
I am furthering my understanding of the architectural experience and the role of the human senses through several books right now including: The Eyes of The Skin by Juhani Pallasmaa, Thinking Architecture by Peter Zumthor, and The Shape of Green by Lance Hosey.

What is your favorite building or who is your favorite architect and why?
My favorite building is the Sendai Mediatheque by Japanese architect Toyo Ito. The structural system itself  is incredible and it is an excellent example of effective biomimicry in architecture, specifically the way that it twists through the building to support it like the roots of a tree.